Yahoo Acquires Zimbra

Zimbra Today, Zimbra announced today that they have been acquired by Yahoo! for $350 million. Zimbra was bound to be acquired by someone and the acquisition by Yahoo! wasn’t an overly surprising move as it has had a tendency to pick up Web 2.0 and Ajax Web Apps over the past few years. It will be great to see where Zimbra (which is an amazing application) goes with the resources that Yahoo! brings to the table.

This purchase is interesting seeing how Plymouth State University, my place of employment, just finished an implementation this summer. With such a large organization backing Zimbra now, it will be interesting how licensing will change over the years. We can always hope that the changes will be minimal…but as always, change is inevitable.

Regardless, the two companies in bed together isn’t too scary of a thought and I look forward to seeing things unfold!

The Ajax Experience: Plan of Attack

The Ajax Experience is next Monday (although I arrive Sunday afternoon) through Wednesday and I’ve prepared my plan of attack:

Monday

10:00am-11:30am: Leveraging Ajax for Enterprise Application Development – Conrad Damon
12:30pm-1:15pm: Keynote: Towards a Service-Oriented Applications Stack – Matt Quinn
1:30pm-3:00pm: Simplify Ajax development with Apache XAP – Bob Buffone
3:30pm-5:00pm: Ruining the User Experience – Aaron Gustafson
5:15pm-6:45pm: Scriptaculous – Justin Gehtland
8:00pm-9:30pm: Expert Panel Discussion

Tuesday

8:30am-10:00am: Intro to Dojo – Alex Russell
10:30am-12:00pm: Yahoo! Experiences with Accessibility, DHTML, and Ajax in Rich (Dunno what Rich is…probably the start of “Rich Internet Applications” [RIA], probably) – Nate Koechley
1:00pm-1:45pm: Keynote: Ajax from AOL’s Perspective – William Morris
2:00pm-3:30pm: RAD 2.0: Working with symfony (PHP) – Dustin Whittle
4:00pm-5:30pm: Markup & CSS for Developers: Empowering the Application Developer with Front End Magic – Molly Holzschlag
7:00pm-7:45pm: Keynote: The Once & Future Web – Chris Wilson
9:00pm-10:30pm: Expert Panel Discussion

Wednesday

9:30am-10:30am: Designing for Ajax – Bill Scott
11:00am-12:30pm: Dojo Cookbook – Dustin Machi

My schedule is subject to change based on buzz or sudden interest in other presentations. I look forward to seeing what they have to offer and will be blogging along the way!

Alexa Search Data For The Masses

Alexa – for those of you that don’t know – is an Amazon owned subsidiary that tracks “valuable information about the web, how it is used, what is important and what is not.” For example, you can search Alexa for amazon.com and find traffic information, related links, etc. Alexa is a hugely useful tool for developers that want to watch their traffic and compare against competing sites. While combing sites and gathering statistics (which it does by the use of the Alexa toolbar as well as piggy backing onto the back of various other toolbars), Alexa has amassed huge amounts of data…and when I say huge amounts of data…I’m serious! Alexa spiders 4 billion to 5 billion pages a month and archives 1 terabyte of data a day.

They’ve been stockpiling search data since its inception in 1996. The great news? They are now opening it up to the public as a pay to play access to their data! Its called the Alexa Web Search Platform. Wired News writes:

To illustrate the new service’s potential, Alexa developed a photo search engine that allows users to query photo metadata normally hidden from standard keyword searches, such as the date the photo was taken or the camera used.

[...]

From computer scientists to web hobbyists, [Alexa CEO Bruce] Gilliat predicted Alexa’s inexpensive services will spawn numerous creative results.

And Slashdot writes:

The Alexa framework is not for the weak of heart — expect to learn how to use their C API, and expect to pay micro-amounts for requests and CPU cycles used — but it also seems to be more powerful than the rival APIs from Yahoo and Google.

While I have no huge reasons to sign-up and pay (however cheaply) for this service just yet, I look forward to seeing what comes of it! Having that much data available at your fingertips is a huge boon to the development and marketing community!